One of my greatest joys is to be of service to the community. One of my greatest passions is organizing and increasing people’s productivity and the way they work. When those two are brought together it allows me to work with a variety of non-profits in the Valley.

Who did I help this year? 

 

In an earlier blog, I wrote about paper journals and notebooks. If you follow my facebook page there were a flurry of comments about the use of different journals and then the discussion quickly turned to what’s out there in terms of technology. One of the best tech tools for capturing ideas is Evernote. Many people use Evernote for jotting down lists but really, this app goes beyond list making. There are several amazing things you can do with Evernote that can support the way you work.

 

As the legend goes, there was a guy from Italy that started the Pomodoro Method. Francisco Cirillo was a college student who struggled with his course work.  Sitting down to study, read and write for the college classes he was taking seemed like drudgery. He was on the verge of failing and stumbled on a technique that worked for him. If he set his timer for just 25 minutes, he could sit, focus, and work through his course work. He found if he set the timer four times and took breaks in between, he could get a lot done. That’s how the Pomodoro Method got started.

Cirillo had one timer, in the shape of a tomato. Tomato in Italian is Pomodoro. Let’s break down the Tomato Method.

 

For nearly three years I’ve been working on growing my business. There have been some fantastic moments and some heartache too. When I first started out, I worked with several business coaches. Usually I think I’m coach-able, this time I didn’t listen. My business coach said it would take 16 to 18 months to get traction on my business. I baulked. It couldn't take that long! Yep! He was right. I was so ready to throw in the towel and give up. Glad that I persevered. Here are some other mistakes I made.

It’s a feeling of overconfidence, ‘I got this, this is going to be easy’ then the doubt starts to creep in. ‘I’m running out of time, what if it doesn’t go well.’ Then the anxiousness starts to appear. I get worried and fearful. Those feelings bring on the flood of overwhelm and I start to feel out of control and smothered by the looming deadline. This is what happens when I procrastinate. What happens to you?

You may feel alone in procrastinating, like you’re the only one but you’re not. The University of Calgary did a study and found one in five people are chronic procrastinators. That number is probably higher when you remove the ‘chronic’ and add in the everyday.